Posts Tagged as syndicated (page 3)

Leadership from the Bottom Up

Usually during Black History month, we remember civil rights icons and reflect on their legacy. But over the past couple years, SOTRU has met a new generation of African-American leaders, people you may not see on TV specials or making nationally acc…

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Re:Defining Black History

During a month selected to celebrate “history,” we certainly are treated to a lot of the same familiar stories: the battles won for Civil Rights, the glory of Martin Luther King Jr.’s words, the hardships endured by slaves. And as important as those narratives are for us to collectively remember, many others get lost in trumpeting the same heroic tales. In this hour, State of the Re:Union zeroes in some of those alternate narratives, ones edited out of the mainstream imagining of Black History, deconstructing the popular perception of certain celebrated moments. VIEW PHOTOS AND MORE

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SOTRU Short: In East Portland, Soccer Helps Make a City Home

What happens if you move to Portland, Oregon and you’re not into bikes or beer? Or if, say, you don’t even speak English? East Portland, a part of the city that looks completely different from the hipster central we’re familiar with from Portlandia, is home to a growing number of immigrants and refugees. Many of them struggle to find work and a sense of connection to their new home in the Pacific Northwest. But some have found that in the effort to integrate, *soccer* can be a useful tool. VIEW PHOTOS AND MORE

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SOTRU Short: Soteria

In the 1970s, a prominent schizophrenia researcher named Dr. Loren Mosher noticed that the standard treatment in the hospital– medication, confinement– didn’t have good outcomes. People didn’t get better in the long-term. So he launched an experiment, to try out pretty much the exact opposite of that treatment in the hospital. He called it Soteria. VIEW PHOTOS AND MORE

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800px-Tulsa

SOTRU Short: Dear Tulsa

Last summer, we visited Tulsa, Oklahoma, where a devastating racial incident in 1921 still divides the city today. That legacy has made it tough for Tulsa to move forward into the future, but in the last decade, it’s tried hard to do just that. The city has a newly revitalized downtown and a growing arts scene, and it wants badly to be known for something more than the hard history that’s shaped it. Writer Russell Cobb used to live in Tulsa and he was never the city’s biggest fan. But he’s watched from a distance as Tulsa has turned a corner, and now… he kind of wants to come back. VIEW PHOTOS AND MORE

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